The ”chromatic endpin“ project at Kickstarter

 

 

Bassist Emilio Guarino from New Jersey (USA) has designed an angled endpin, and in order to mass-produce this endpin, he asks for support at Kickstarter:

Angled bass endpins were first adopted by Francois Rabbath and his students, but thanks to their many benefits they are becoming more mainstream every year.
Angled endpins are very popular because they make the bass easier to play. The bass feels as if it is floating. It moves with the motion you need to play the instrument, not against it. Straight endpins balance best when the bass is completely vertical. This position is not ideal for actually playing it. If you’ve ever felt like it was difficult to keep the bass in a comfortable position, you know what I’m talking about. Angled endpins keep the bass in a comfortable position in all ranges of the instrument.

I created The Chromatic Endpin to solve these problems. I wanted a solution that I could use on different basses and allow me to experiment without modifying my instrument. Also, it has the added benefit of being very user friendly. No professional installation is necessary. It takes less than two minutes to assemble and it adjusts even faster.

 

Thelonius Monk’s List of Tips for Playing a Gig

Transcribed by soprano sax player Steve Lacy in a spiral-bound notebook, Thelonious Monk created a primer of do’s and don’ts for club musicians.

Here’s a transcript of the text:

  • Just because you’re not a drummer, doesn’t mean that you don’t have to keep time.
  • Pat your foot and sing the melody in your head when you play.
  • Stop playing all that bullshit, those weird notes, play the melody!
  • Make the drummer sound good.
  • Discrimination is important.
  • You’ve got to dig it to dig it, you dig?
  • All reet!
  • Always know
  • It must be always night, otherwise they wouldn’t need the lights.
  • Let’s lift the band stand!!
  • I want to avoid the hecklers.
  • Don’t play the piano part, I am playing that. Don’t listen to me, I am supposed to be accompanying you!
  • The inside of the tune (the bridge) is the part that makes the outside sound good.
  • Don’t play everything (or everytime); let some things go by. Some music just imagined.
  • What you don’t play can be more important than what you do play.
  • A note can be small as a pin or as big as the world, it depends on your imagination.
  • Stay in shape! Sometimes a musician waits for a gig & when it comes, he’s out of shape & can’t make it.
  • When you are swinging, swing some more!
  • (What should we wear tonight?) Sharp as possible!
  • Always leave them wanting more.
  • Don’t sound anybody for a gig, just be on the scene.
  • Those pieces were written so as to have something to play & to get cats interested enough to come to rehearsal!
  • You’ve got it! If you don’t want to play, tell a joke or dance, but in any case, you got it! (to a drummer who didn’t want to solo).
  • Whatever you think can’t be done, somebody will come along & do it. A genius is the one most like himself.
  • They tried to get me to hate white people, but someone would always come along & spoil it.

Jazz Skateboards

kind of blue

 

 

 

More sports in 2016? Here you go: get a skateboard from manufacturer Western Union featuring Jazz heroes like Miles Davis, Bill Evans, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker …
Western Union also offers boards for double bassists, featuring pictures of Richard Davis, Charles Mingus and Paul Chambers.

 

Granz-Brad richard davis Mingus-Brad Instrument-2-Toeda

Sears & Roebuck catalogue anno 1902

Back in the early days of the 20th century, the Sears company published mail-order catalogues that offered nearly everything: clothes, shoes, hardware, construction materials, bicycles …  they even started to make their own line of automobiles in 1906. Of course, they also carried all kinds of string instruments and double basses (probably imported from Germany, at this time). Price point: 18.95 USD to 22.85 USD.
You even got a fingerboard chart with every instrument: “It can be firmly gummed to the fingerboard, and in no way interferes with the tone or playing of the instrument.“

1902_Sears__bass